Is have singular or plural

Is “have” singular or plural?

English verbs usually have two present-tense forms, one for use with third-person singular subjects and one for all other subjects.
In most cases (even strong verbs with weirdly irregular declensions in past forms) the former is formed by adding -s [with certain predictable orthographic adjustments] to the bare infinitive and the latter is identical to the bare infinitive.
Very common, old verbs like be and have tend to be exceptions, but have does make the usual third-person singular distinction even if spelled differently.
Now let's have fun with the most irregular of verbs (as it is in most natural languages), be.
It has a separate first-person singular form in the indicative present, has an infinitive that looks nothing like anything besides the participles, and makes a really unusual distinction in the past indicative.
But in general, is were singular or plural? Get that one right and you're really an ace.
Another mind-boggler: “defective" auxiliary verbs like must and can that have only one form for present tense, no other tenses or participles at all, and not even an infinitive.
If you want to do much with, say, must, you'll have to change it to “have to" like I just did.

Only nouns and pronouns can be one thing/person ( singular) or more than one thing/person (plural).
Verbs have forms that we learn to use with various singular and plural noun or pronoun subjects.
“Have" can be a stand-alone verb with a plural noun subject or many singular and plural pronoun subjects ( e.
g.
, trees have leaves, I have money, they have money).
Or “have" can be a part of a verb phrase (Trees have been dying; I/they have been found).
It is quite confusing and misleading, and to my mind fuzzy thinking, to say that verbs of themselves are singular or plural.

Have is both singular and plural
It depends on subjects et alI.
In I have,have is singular
In you have,it may be singular/plural
You all have ,have plural
In we have,have plural
A plural subject takes plural verb
After plural subjects,have is treated plural.

They have an idea.
We have the same idea.
He, she, or it has a different idea.

I have a singular answer to this question, but others may have a plural one.

HAVE goes with only two singular pronouns- you and I.

FOR EX- I have your faith.
/ You have my pen.
Other than that, it goes with the plural pronouns for denoting present tense.
FOR EX- They have money/ We have food in store.
While using ‘do’ verbs we need to put the original verb, hence there we have to put HAVE.
FOR EX- She does not have food.
/ They don't have our support.
I hope it helps

‘have’ is always plural.
Using ‘have’ with ‘I’ and singular ‘you’ is an exception.

Verbs can also be singular and plural.
Singular verb can be formed by adding ‘s’ or ‘es’, and plural verb can be formed without adding ‘s’ or ‘es’.
The question of adding ‘s’ or ‘es’ arises only in the present tense.
In the past and future tense, the question of singular/plural doesn’t arise at all.

Is “have” singular or plural?

English verbs usually have two present-tense forms, one for use with third-person singular subjects and one for all other subjects.
In most cases (even strong verbs with weirdly irregular declensions in past forms) the former is formed by adding -s [with certain predictable orthographic adjustments] to the bare infinitive and the latter is identical to the bare infinitive.
Very common, old verbs like be and have tend to be exceptions, but have does make the usual third-person singular distinction even if spelled differently.
Now let's have fun with the most irregular of verbs (as it is in most natural languages), be.
It has a separate first-person singular form in the indicative present, has an infinitive that looks nothing like anything besides the participles, and makes a really unusual distinction in the past indicative.
But in general, is were singular or plural? Get that one right and you're really an ace.
Another mind-boggler: “defective" auxiliary verbs like must and can that have only one form for present tense, no other tenses or participles at all, and not even an infinitive.
If you want to do much with, say, must, you'll have to change it to “have to" like I just did.

Only nouns and pronouns can be one thing/person ( singular) or more than one thing/person (plural).
Verbs have forms that we learn to use with various singular and plural noun or pronoun subjects.
“Have" can be a stand-alone verb with a plural noun subject or many singular and plural pronoun subjects ( e.
g.
, trees have leaves, I have money, they have money).
Or “have" can be a part of a verb phrase (Trees have been dying; I/they have been found).
It is quite confusing and misleading, and to my mind fuzzy thinking, to say that verbs of themselves are singular or plural.

Have is both singular and plural
It depends on subjects et alI.
In I have,have is singular
In you have,it may be singular/plural
You all have ,have plural
In we have,have plural
A plural subject takes plural verb
After plural subjects,have is treated plural.

They have an idea.
We have the same idea.
He, she, or it has a different idea.

I have a singular answer to this question, but others may have a plural one.

HAVE goes with only two singular pronouns- you and I.

FOR EX- I have your faith.
/ You have my pen.
Other than that, it goes with the plural pronouns for denoting present tense.
FOR EX- They have money/ We have food in store.
While using ‘do’ verbs we need to put the original verb, hence there we have to put HAVE.
FOR EX- She does not have food.
/ They don't have our support.
I hope it helps

‘have’ is always plural.
Using ‘have’ with ‘I’ and singular ‘you’ is an exception.

Verbs can also be singular and plural.
Singular verb can be formed by adding ‘s’ or ‘es’, and plural verb can be formed without adding ‘s’ or ‘es’.
The question of adding ‘s’ or ‘es’ arises only in the present tense.
In the past and future tense, the question of singular/plural doesn’t arise at all.

Is “have” singular or plural?

English verbs usually have two present-tense forms, one for use with third-person singular subjects and one for all other subjects.
In most cases (even strong verbs with weirdly irregular declensions in past forms) the former is formed by adding -s [with certain predictable orthographic adjustments] to the bare infinitive and the latter is identical to the bare infinitive.
Very common, old verbs like be and have tend to be exceptions, but have does make the usual third-person singular distinction even if spelled differently.
Now let's have fun with the most irregular of verbs (as it is in most natural languages), be.
It has a separate first-person singular form in the indicative present, has an infinitive that looks nothing like anything besides the participles, and makes a really unusual distinction in the past indicative.
But in general, is were singular or plural? Get that one right and you're really an ace.
Another mind-boggler: “defective" auxiliary verbs like must and can that have only one form for present tense, no other tenses or participles at all, and not even an infinitive.
If you want to do much with, say, must, you'll have to change it to “have to" like I just did.

Only nouns and pronouns can be one thing/person ( singular) or more than one thing/person (plural).
Verbs have forms that we learn to use with various singular and plural noun or pronoun subjects.
“Have" can be a stand-alone verb with a plural noun subject or many singular and plural pronoun subjects ( e.
g.
, trees have leaves, I have money, they have money).
Or “have" can be a part of a verb phrase (Trees have been dying; I/they have been found).
It is quite confusing and misleading, and to my mind fuzzy thinking, to say that verbs of themselves are singular or plural.

Have is both singular and plural
It depends on subjects et alI.
In I have,have is singular
In you have,it may be singular/plural
You all have ,have plural
In we have,have plural
A plural subject takes plural verb
After plural subjects,have is treated plural.

They have an idea.
We have the same idea.
He, she, or it has a different idea.

I have a singular answer to this question, but others may have a plural one.

HAVE goes with only two singular pronouns- you and I.

FOR EX- I have your faith.
/ You have my pen.
Other than that, it goes with the plural pronouns for denoting present tense.
FOR EX- They have money/ We have food in store.
While using ‘do’ verbs we need to put the original verb, hence there we have to put HAVE.
FOR EX- She does not have food.
/ They don't have our support.
I hope it helps

‘have’ is always plural.
Using ‘have’ with ‘I’ and singular ‘you’ is an exception.

Verbs can also be singular and plural.
Singular verb can be formed by adding ‘s’ or ‘es’, and plural verb can be formed without adding ‘s’ or ‘es’.
The question of adding ‘s’ or ‘es’ arises only in the present tense.
In the past and future tense, the question of singular/plural doesn’t arise at all.

Updated: 10.07.2019 — 1:51 pm

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